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redwingfever
satinwood wrote:
blade12 wrote:
redwingfever wrote:
johnwall wrote:
In the Mississippi Valley Conference, the term Varsity Reserve would be equivalent to JV at most other schools in the state. MVC teams have only 3 levels of boys basketball (down from 4 levels about 5 years ago). Varsity, Varsity Reserve and JV. So simply stated, VR is equivalent to JV......and in most cases, JV here is equivalent to Freshmen or "C" squads, although some JV teams here will have a few sophs on them.

I don't know why it's called VR here, but has been for a long time and does cause confusion when MVC teams VR's play against Big Rivers teams JV's. They are the same thing.


Last year the FRCC went away from the traditional Varsity, JV, Freshman breakdown of teams for girls. Now they have Varsity, JV1 and JV2 (similar to soccer). For boys I believe they kept it the same because most schools in the conference have two freshman teams, but just another example of the different names each level can have.


How are JV1 and JV2 teams selected? A & B, split teams, rotated around?

I am just curious how common this is and how schools around the state do this. I haven't seen a lot of it but do notice a lot of larger rosters mainly at freshmen levels each year . Maybe that is the influx of kids that come thru the feeder programs that are so prominent these days.


The Southern Lakes Conference went to JV1 and JV2 for all sports except football. JV1 can have players in grades 9-11, and JV2 can have players in grades 9-10. We went to this instead of JV/frosh to provide more flexibility in being able to field teams at all three levels, especially in girls sports. Other conferences may define their JV1 and JV2 differently.


This is the same situation in the FRCC as well for girls hoops.

On the boys side, at Sheboygan South under the previous coach, the definitive break-up of two freshman teams in an 'A' and a 'B' team was abandoned in favor of having one large roster, and then a rotation of how the teams were broken up on a given night. This allowed for each player at the freshman level to play with every other player at least a few times throughout the season. The team also practiced together as one.
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satinwood
redwingfever wrote:
satinwood wrote:
blade12 wrote:
redwingfever wrote:
johnwall wrote:
In the Mississippi Valley Conference, the term Varsity Reserve would be equivalent to JV at most other schools in the state. MVC teams have only 3 levels of boys basketball (down from 4 levels about 5 years ago). Varsity, Varsity Reserve and JV. So simply stated, VR is equivalent to JV......and in most cases, JV here is equivalent to Freshmen or "C" squads, although some JV teams here will have a few sophs on them.

I don't know why it's called VR here, but has been for a long time and does cause confusion when MVC teams VR's play against Big Rivers teams JV's. They are the same thing.


Last year the FRCC went away from the traditional Varsity, JV, Freshman breakdown of teams for girls. Now they have Varsity, JV1 and JV2 (similar to soccer). For boys I believe they kept it the same because most schools in the conference have two freshman teams, but just another example of the different names each level can have.


How are JV1 and JV2 teams selected? A & B, split teams, rotated around?

I am just curious how common this is and how schools around the state do this. I haven't seen a lot of it but do notice a lot of larger rosters mainly at freshmen levels each year . Maybe that is the influx of kids that come thru the feeder programs that are so prominent these days.


The Southern Lakes Conference went to JV1 and JV2 for all sports except football. JV1 can have players in grades 9-11, and JV2 can have players in grades 9-10. We went to this instead of JV/frosh to provide more flexibility in being able to field teams at all three levels, especially in girls sports. Other conferences may define their JV1 and JV2 differently.


This is the same situation in the FRCC as well for girls hoops.

On the boys side, at Sheboygan South under the previous coach, the definitive break-up of two freshman teams in an 'A' and a 'B' team was abandoned in favor of having one large roster, and then a rotation of how the teams were broken up on a given night. This allowed for each player at the freshman level to play with every other player at least a few times throughout the season. The team also practiced together as one.


Not quite the same...each team has its own roster. JV1 is basically your regular JV/sophomore team with the ability to move down juniors to fill out the roster. JV2 is basically your freshman team with the ability to move down sophomores to fill out the roster. Without the ability to move a few kids down, some schools might not field teams at the freshman level because of numbers throughout the program. Players are not rotated from team to team. The renaming of the levels is more semantics than anything. Plus, you are not restricted to "Grade 9 Only" rules for JV2 if there are sophomores on the team, too.
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blade12
redwingfever wrote:
satinwood wrote:
blade12 wrote:
redwingfever wrote:
johnwall wrote:
In the Mississippi Valley Conference, the term Varsity Reserve would be equivalent to JV at most other schools in the state. MVC teams have only 3 levels of boys basketball (down from 4 levels about 5 years ago). Varsity, Varsity Reserve and JV. So simply stated, VR is equivalent to JV......and in most cases, JV here is equivalent to Freshmen or "C" squads, although some JV teams here will have a few sophs on them.

I don't know why it's called VR here, but has been for a long time and does cause confusion when MVC teams VR's play against Big Rivers teams JV's. They are the same thing.


Last year the FRCC went away from the traditional Varsity, JV, Freshman breakdown of teams for girls. Now they have Varsity, JV1 and JV2 (similar to soccer). For boys I believe they kept it the same because most schools in the conference have two freshman teams, but just another example of the different names each level can have.


How are JV1 and JV2 teams selected? A & B, split teams, rotated around?

I am just curious how common this is and how schools around the state do this. I haven't seen a lot of it but do notice a lot of larger rosters mainly at freshmen levels each year . Maybe that is the influx of kids that come thru the feeder programs that are so prominent these days.


The Southern Lakes Conference went to JV1 and JV2 for all sports except football. JV1 can have players in grades 9-11, and JV2 can have players in grades 9-10. We went to this instead of JV/frosh to provide more flexibility in being able to field teams at all three levels, especially in girls sports. Other conferences may define their JV1 and JV2 differently.


This is the same situation in the FRCC as well for girls hoops.

On the boys side, at Sheboygan South under the previous coach, the definitive break-up of two freshman teams in an 'A' and a 'B' team was abandoned in favor of having one large roster, and then a rotation of how the teams were broken up on a given night. This allowed for each player at the freshman level to play with every other player at least a few times throughout the season. The team also practiced together as one.


How did that go over?

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redwingfever
satinwood wrote:
redwingfever wrote:
satinwood wrote:
blade12 wrote:
redwingfever wrote:
johnwall wrote:
In the Mississippi Valley Conference, the term Varsity Reserve would be equivalent to JV at most other schools in the state. MVC teams have only 3 levels of boys basketball (down from 4 levels about 5 years ago). Varsity, Varsity Reserve and JV. So simply stated, VR is equivalent to JV......and in most cases, JV here is equivalent to Freshmen or "C" squads, although some JV teams here will have a few sophs on them.

I don't know why it's called VR here, but has been for a long time and does cause confusion when MVC teams VR's play against Big Rivers teams JV's. They are the same thing.


Last year the FRCC went away from the traditional Varsity, JV, Freshman breakdown of teams for girls. Now they have Varsity, JV1 and JV2 (similar to soccer). For boys I believe they kept it the same because most schools in the conference have two freshman teams, but just another example of the different names each level can have.


How are JV1 and JV2 teams selected? A & B, split teams, rotated around?

I am just curious how common this is and how schools around the state do this. I haven't seen a lot of it but do notice a lot of larger rosters mainly at freshmen levels each year . Maybe that is the influx of kids that come thru the feeder programs that are so prominent these days.


The Southern Lakes Conference went to JV1 and JV2 for all sports except football. JV1 can have players in grades 9-11, and JV2 can have players in grades 9-10. We went to this instead of JV/frosh to provide more flexibility in being able to field teams at all three levels, especially in girls sports. Other conferences may define their JV1 and JV2 differently.


This is the same situation in the FRCC as well for girls hoops.

On the boys side, at Sheboygan South under the previous coach, the definitive break-up of two freshman teams in an 'A' and a 'B' team was abandoned in favor of having one large roster, and then a rotation of how the teams were broken up on a given night. This allowed for each player at the freshman level to play with every other player at least a few times throughout the season. The team also practiced together as one.


Not quite the same...each team has its own roster. JV1 is basically your regular JV/sophomore team with the ability to move down juniors to fill out the roster. JV2 is basically your freshman team with the ability to move down sophomores to fill out the roster. Without the ability to move a few kids down, some schools might not field teams at the freshman level because of numbers throughout the program. Players are not rotated from team to team. The renaming of the levels is more semantics than anything. Plus, you are not restricted to "Grade 9 Only" rules for JV2 if there are sophomores on the team, too.


Sorry, don't think I was clear. For girls basketball, JV1 and JV2 are the same as you described. It is a "set" roster, with JV1 being the equivalent of JV and JV2 the equivalent of freshman with the occasional junior on JV1 or sophomore on JV2.

But for boys basketball that's not the case in the FRCC.

Blade, it was unique, that's for sure. I believe the way it was run is at the beginning of the season each player was given a specific schedule for which games he would play. I want to say that when South would play schools that also had two freshman teams, the teams would tend to be split closer to an A and B squad, but when it was just one team (say GB East only had one freshman team) then it would be evenly split with half the team playing East and the other half playing some other opponent so that both had games.
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kimberlymanager
I know Kimberly had a Varsity Reserve game against Seymour a couple of years ago. The jump from JV to Varsity really hurts playing time for most Juniors. I like the idea of JV1 and JV2 teams. I know in Football Juniors play on JV if the aren't quite good enough for Varsity and that keeps talented Juniors from quitting because they have no playing time. Doing the same thing by adding Sophomores to the Frosh team. I also know that schools like Oshkosh West would have 2 Freshmen teams because they had so many players going out. Unfortunately they only get half the games. I really like the idea of Varsity Reserve teams.
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hueby
I had never heard of Reserve Games until we moved to Wisconsin. I think anytime you can get as many kids playing-the better!

Still have your "A-1" varsity team and all. Just get the rest competing.

I'm doing a little research story on the U.P. football site involving basketball. 70 years ago the varsity teams usually played 5-7 kids a game-that's it. The rest of the players were on the "B" team and in this year as the team was losing, many players were moved up & down as the coach looked for the winning combinations (plus dealing with illness & injuries from the football season).

In time the coach found it!

Can see where eventually through time it was "Let's just put 10-12 on the varsity" but most bench warmers didn't see much playing time.
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hueby
Also wanted to add, it can be a nice time to experiment with many of the different underclassmen too. Reserve juniors with stronger underclassmen, etc.

I'd like to see more of these types of games. Think they are a good idea!
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