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hgerner13
I've always hated the idea of "paying" college athletes cash to play. There are just way too many variables to set a number for every athlete. A lot of the smaller schools would end up having to drop their programs, because they don't generate enough revenue to support paying their players.

However, the unlimited meals is a great step, as that is an expense the athletes no longer have to worry about. That is the kind of compensation I would like to see. Most of these kids already get their room and board paid for through their scholarships, so adding the food portion to that was a great first step. Do I think they should get a few extra bucks so they can spend it on beer and beats? Ahhhh no, going the cash route is a slippery slope. BUT there are small things that can be done to help ease small burdens I.e. Movie passes, universally determined gift card amounts to restaurants or entertainment venues, sanctioned team outings...stuff like that. NEVER cash.
Quote 0 0
john42
dawgstyle wrote:
Also, using Northwestern as an example is probably a bit misleading. You picked one of the most expensive D1 Football schools out there. Although I am sure you picked them because of the Union situation.

The cost of last year at Florida is estimated by their site at $20,220. That is the cost of everything. If it was a local kid who could live at home, the cost drops to an astounding $11,790. Mind you that is instate, which I would venture at least half of their team is instate. The Florida football program profited $51,000,000 last year.

Not nearly as glamorous anymore.



So what your saying is Florida should sponser football and men's basketball and no other sports? I'm sure those are the only sports that make a profit. Does that mean we can throw out Title IX?
"If I caught 756, I'd take a sharpie out of my pocket and draw on asterisk on it then hand it to Barry for free."

? Rubenonfire
Quote 0 0
john42
dawgstyle wrote:
john42 wrote:
The WIAA makes very good money on the boys state basketball tournament and uses it to fund other state tournaments that don't make money. Should the WIAA be paying high school boys basketball players since they profit off them?



Ok, not that the WIAA and the NCAA are even remotely the same, but I will humor you. First, define "very good money."


The WIAA had a profit of close to $800,000 last year.

A total of 46 percent of the WIAA?s tournament revenue came from the state basketball tournament meaning the revenue from basketball was roughly 3.68 million dollars. I don't know the profit but considering gymnastics, swimming, baseball, golf, tennis, softball, cross country, and track and field each produced net losses for the WIAA, I would assume the profit is very nice in basketball.

If you feel college players should get over and above what they get already, I don't see how you can feel like high school basketball players shouldn't get paid. I guarantee a lot more high school athletes than college scholarship athletes go to bed hungry.
"If I caught 756, I'd take a sharpie out of my pocket and draw on asterisk on it then hand it to Barry for free."

? Rubenonfire
Quote 0 0
dawgstyle
john42 wrote:
dawgstyle wrote:
john42 wrote:
The WIAA makes very good money on the boys state basketball tournament and uses it to fund other state tournaments that don't make money. Should the WIAA be paying high school boys basketball players since they profit off them?



Ok, not that the WIAA and the NCAA are even remotely the same, but I will humor you. First, define "very good money."


The WIAA had a profit of close to $800,000 last year.

A total of 46 percent of the WIAA?s tournament revenue came from the state basketball tournament meaning the revenue from basketball was roughly 3.68 million dollars. I don't know the profit but considering gymnastics, swimming, baseball, golf, tennis, softball, cross country, and track and field each produced net losses for the WIAA, I would assume the profit is very nice in basketball.

If you feel college players should get over and above what they get already, I don't see how you can feel like high school basketball players shouldn't get paid. I guarantee a lot more high school athletes than college scholarship athletes go to bed hungry.


Does the WIAA prevent kids from accepting a free pizza from someone that enjoys watching the kids play? If Kevon Looney wanted to sell his autograph to a neighbor for $500, would the WIAA do anything about that? If someone takes one of the kids on a trip and pays their way, does the WIAA take away their opportunity to participate? Does the WIAA sell jerseys with particular kids school and number on it for profit?

85 Scholarship Kids created $51,000,000 in profit for Florida last year and you somehow plan to compare that to an unknown number of profit from the thousands of kids that played basketball in the state of WI.
@2GuysFromWI

Harbaugh will have Urban Meyer retired from OSU by 2020.
Quote 0 0
john42
dawgstyle wrote:
john42 wrote:
dawgstyle wrote:
john42 wrote:
The WIAA makes very good money on the boys state basketball tournament and uses it to fund other state tournaments that don't make money. Should the WIAA be paying high school boys basketball players since they profit off them?



Ok, not that the WIAA and the NCAA are even remotely the same, but I will humor you. First, define "very good money."


The WIAA had a profit of close to $800,000 last year.

A total of 46 percent of the WIAA?s tournament revenue came from the state basketball tournament meaning the revenue from basketball was roughly 3.68 million dollars. I don't know the profit but considering gymnastics, swimming, baseball, golf, tennis, softball, cross country, and track and field each produced net losses for the WIAA, I would assume the profit is very nice in basketball.

If you feel college players should get over and above what they get already, I don't see how you can feel like high school basketball players shouldn't get paid. I guarantee a lot more high school athletes than college scholarship athletes go to bed hungry.


Does the WIAA prevent kids from accepting a free pizza from someone that enjoys watching the kids play? If Kevon Looney wanted to sell his autograph to a neighbor for $500, would the WIAA do anything about that? If someone takes one of the kids on a trip and pays their way, does the WIAA take away their opportunity to participate? Does the WIAA sell jerseys with particular kids school and number on it for profit?

85 Scholarship Kids created $51,000,000 in profit for Florida last year and you somehow plan to compare that to an unknown number of profit from the thousands of kids that played basketball in the state of WI.


You would be surprised what the WIAA limits. Yes Looney would lose eligibility for accepting any kind of gift.

When I was coaching stupid WIAA rules probably cost our team a state title and at the very least a state appearance because one of our players played in a church league softball event during the season. An opposing coach turned her in and she was ineligible for the remainder of the season.
"If I caught 756, I'd take a sharpie out of my pocket and draw on asterisk on it then hand it to Barry for free."

? Rubenonfire
Quote 0 0
dawgstyle
Some interesting points from the NW standpoint.

http://mgoblog.com/content/fisking-internet-capa
@2GuysFromWI

Harbaugh will have Urban Meyer retired from OSU by 2020.
Quote 0 0
bhsblackhawks
dawgstyle wrote:
john42 wrote:
dawgstyle wrote:
john42 wrote:
The WIAA makes very good money on the boys state basketball tournament and uses it to fund other state tournaments that don't make money. Should the WIAA be paying high school boys basketball players since they profit off them?



Ok, not that the WIAA and the NCAA are even remotely the same, but I will humor you. First, define "very good money."


The WIAA had a profit of close to $800,000 last year.

A total of 46 percent of the WIAA?s tournament revenue came from the state basketball tournament meaning the revenue from basketball was roughly 3.68 million dollars. I don't know the profit but considering gymnastics, swimming, baseball, golf, tennis, softball, cross country, and track and field each produced net losses for the WIAA, I would assume the profit is very nice in basketball.

If you feel college players should get over and above what they get already, I don't see how you can feel like high school basketball players shouldn't get paid. I guarantee a lot more high school athletes than college scholarship athletes go to bed hungry.


Does the WIAA prevent kids from accepting a free pizza from someone that enjoys watching the kids play? If Kevon Looney wanted to sell his autograph to a neighbor for $500, would the WIAA do anything about that? If someone takes one of the kids on a trip and pays their way, does the WIAA take away their opportunity to participate? Does the WIAA sell jerseys with particular kids school and number on it for profit?

85 Scholarship Kids created $51,000,000 in profit for Florida last year and you somehow plan to compare that to an unknown number of profit from the thousands of kids that played basketball in the state of WI.

Here's one for you: annual kickball tournament at a local bar with a prize of $100 for the winning team. AD told a team full of football players they couldn't participate in it due to the potential of the championship winnings...

I don't know if our AD was interpreting the rules correctly, but I wasn't going to challenge him on it.
Quote 0 0
dawgstyle
john42 wrote:
dawgstyle wrote:
john42 wrote:
dawgstyle wrote:
john42 wrote:
The WIAA makes very good money on the boys state basketball tournament and uses it to fund other state tournaments that don't make money. Should the WIAA be paying high school boys basketball players since they profit off them?



Ok, not that the WIAA and the NCAA are even remotely the same, but I will humor you. First, define "very good money."


The WIAA had a profit of close to $800,000 last year.

A total of 46 percent of the WIAA?s tournament revenue came from the state basketball tournament meaning the revenue from basketball was roughly 3.68 million dollars. I don't know the profit but considering gymnastics, swimming, baseball, golf, tennis, softball, cross country, and track and field each produced net losses for the WIAA, I would assume the profit is very nice in basketball.

If you feel college players should get over and above what they get already, I don't see how you can feel like high school basketball players shouldn't get paid. I guarantee a lot more high school athletes than college scholarship athletes go to bed hungry.


Does the WIAA prevent kids from accepting a free pizza from someone that enjoys watching the kids play? If Kevon Looney wanted to sell his autograph to a neighbor for $500, would the WIAA do anything about that? If someone takes one of the kids on a trip and pays their way, does the WIAA take away their opportunity to participate? Does the WIAA sell jerseys with particular kids school and number on it for profit?

85 Scholarship Kids created $51,000,000 in profit for Florida last year and you somehow plan to compare that to an unknown number of profit from the thousands of kids that played basketball in the state of WI.


You would be surprised what the WIAA limits. Yes Looney would lose eligibility for accepting any kind of gift.

When I was coaching stupid WIAA rules probably cost our team a state title and at the very least a state appearance because one of our players played in a church league softball event during the season. An opposing coach turned her in and she was ineligible for the remainder of the season.


Including the pizza? What about using someone elses garage to fix his car? Or washing their car?

http://www.cbssports.com/golf/eye-on-golf/22327295/a-studentathlete-washing-her-car-at-college-is-not-an-ncaa-violation

What is the limitations as far as the WIAA is concerned? Just no cash? We played in 3 on 3 tournaments in high school and never got in any trouble for it. Teams won prizes all the time. But not cash.
@2GuysFromWI

Harbaugh will have Urban Meyer retired from OSU by 2020.
Quote 0 0
dawgstyle
bhsblackhawks wrote:
dawgstyle wrote:
john42 wrote:
dawgstyle wrote:
john42 wrote:
The WIAA makes very good money on the boys state basketball tournament and uses it to fund other state tournaments that don't make money. Should the WIAA be paying high school boys basketball players since they profit off them?



Ok, not that the WIAA and the NCAA are even remotely the same, but I will humor you. First, define "very good money."


The WIAA had a profit of close to $800,000 last year.

A total of 46 percent of the WIAA?s tournament revenue came from the state basketball tournament meaning the revenue from basketball was roughly 3.68 million dollars. I don't know the profit but considering gymnastics, swimming, baseball, golf, tennis, softball, cross country, and track and field each produced net losses for the WIAA, I would assume the profit is very nice in basketball.

If you feel college players should get over and above what they get already, I don't see how you can feel like high school basketball players shouldn't get paid. I guarantee a lot more high school athletes than college scholarship athletes go to bed hungry.


Does the WIAA prevent kids from accepting a free pizza from someone that enjoys watching the kids play? If Kevon Looney wanted to sell his autograph to a neighbor for $500, would the WIAA do anything about that? If someone takes one of the kids on a trip and pays their way, does the WIAA take away their opportunity to participate? Does the WIAA sell jerseys with particular kids school and number on it for profit?

85 Scholarship Kids created $51,000,000 in profit for Florida last year and you somehow plan to compare that to an unknown number of profit from the thousands of kids that played basketball in the state of WI.

Here's one for you: annual kickball tournament at a local bar with a prize of $100 for the winning team. AD told a team full of football players they couldn't participate in it due to the potential of the championship winnings...

I don't know if our AD was interpreting the rules correctly, but I wasn't going to challenge him on it.


High school or college?
@2GuysFromWI

Harbaugh will have Urban Meyer retired from OSU by 2020.
Quote 0 0
bhsblackhawks
dawgstyle wrote:
bhsblackhawks wrote:
dawgstyle wrote:
john42 wrote:
dawgstyle wrote:
john42 wrote:
The WIAA makes very good money on the boys state basketball tournament and uses it to fund other state tournaments that don't make money. Should the WIAA be paying high school boys basketball players since they profit off them?



Ok, not that the WIAA and the NCAA are even remotely the same, but I will humor you. First, define "very good money."


The WIAA had a profit of close to $800,000 last year.

A total of 46 percent of the WIAA?s tournament revenue came from the state basketball tournament meaning the revenue from basketball was roughly 3.68 million dollars. I don't know the profit but considering gymnastics, swimming, baseball, golf, tennis, softball, cross country, and track and field each produced net losses for the WIAA, I would assume the profit is very nice in basketball.

If you feel college players should get over and above what they get already, I don't see how you can feel like high school basketball players shouldn't get paid. I guarantee a lot more high school athletes than college scholarship athletes go to bed hungry.


Does the WIAA prevent kids from accepting a free pizza from someone that enjoys watching the kids play? If Kevon Looney wanted to sell his autograph to a neighbor for $500, would the WIAA do anything about that? If someone takes one of the kids on a trip and pays their way, does the WIAA take away their opportunity to participate? Does the WIAA sell jerseys with particular kids school and number on it for profit?

85 Scholarship Kids created $51,000,000 in profit for Florida last year and you somehow plan to compare that to an unknown number of profit from the thousands of kids that played basketball in the state of WI.

Here's one for you: annual kickball tournament at a local bar with a prize of $100 for the winning team. AD told a team full of football players they couldn't participate in it due to the potential of the championship winnings...

I don't know if our AD was interpreting the rules correctly, but I wasn't going to challenge him on it.


High school or college?

It was high school. It was kids in my sister's class a year or two after I graduated.
Quote 0 0
dawgstyle
bhsblackhawks wrote:
dawgstyle wrote:
bhsblackhawks wrote:
dawgstyle wrote:
john42 wrote:
dawgstyle wrote:
john42 wrote:
The WIAA makes very good money on the boys state basketball tournament and uses it to fund other state tournaments that don't make money. Should the WIAA be paying high school boys basketball players since they profit off them?



Ok, not that the WIAA and the NCAA are even remotely the same, but I will humor you. First, define "very good money."


The WIAA had a profit of close to $800,000 last year.

A total of 46 percent of the WIAA?s tournament revenue came from the state basketball tournament meaning the revenue from basketball was roughly 3.68 million dollars. I don't know the profit but considering gymnastics, swimming, baseball, golf, tennis, softball, cross country, and track and field each produced net losses for the WIAA, I would assume the profit is very nice in basketball.

If you feel college players should get over and above what they get already, I don't see how you can feel like high school basketball players shouldn't get paid. I guarantee a lot more high school athletes than college scholarship athletes go to bed hungry.


Does the WIAA prevent kids from accepting a free pizza from someone that enjoys watching the kids play? If Kevon Looney wanted to sell his autograph to a neighbor for $500, would the WIAA do anything about that? If someone takes one of the kids on a trip and pays their way, does the WIAA take away their opportunity to participate? Does the WIAA sell jerseys with particular kids school and number on it for profit?

85 Scholarship Kids created $51,000,000 in profit for Florida last year and you somehow plan to compare that to an unknown number of profit from the thousands of kids that played basketball in the state of WI.

Here's one for you: annual kickball tournament at a local bar with a prize of $100 for the winning team. AD told a team full of football players they couldn't participate in it due to the potential of the championship winnings...

I don't know if our AD was interpreting the rules correctly, but I wasn't going to challenge him on it.


High school or college?

It was high school. It was kids in my sister's class a year or two after I graduated.

Interesting.
@2GuysFromWI

Harbaugh will have Urban Meyer retired from OSU by 2020.
Quote 0 0
john42
dawgstyle wrote:
john42 wrote:
dawgstyle wrote:
john42 wrote:
dawgstyle wrote:
john42 wrote:
The WIAA makes very good money on the boys state basketball tournament and uses it to fund other state tournaments that don't make money. Should the WIAA be paying high school boys basketball players since they profit off them?



Ok, not that the WIAA and the NCAA are even remotely the same, but I will humor you. First, define "very good money."


The WIAA had a profit of close to $800,000 last year.

A total of 46 percent of the WIAA?s tournament revenue came from the state basketball tournament meaning the revenue from basketball was roughly 3.68 million dollars. I don't know the profit but considering gymnastics, swimming, baseball, golf, tennis, softball, cross country, and track and field each produced net losses for the WIAA, I would assume the profit is very nice in basketball.

If you feel college players should get over and above what they get already, I don't see how you can feel like high school basketball players shouldn't get paid. I guarantee a lot more high school athletes than college scholarship athletes go to bed hungry.


Does the WIAA prevent kids from accepting a free pizza from someone that enjoys watching the kids play? If Kevon Looney wanted to sell his autograph to a neighbor for $500, would the WIAA do anything about that? If someone takes one of the kids on a trip and pays their way, does the WIAA take away their opportunity to participate? Does the WIAA sell jerseys with particular kids school and number on it for profit?

85 Scholarship Kids created $51,000,000 in profit for Florida last year and you somehow plan to compare that to an unknown number of profit from the thousands of kids that played basketball in the state of WI.


You would be surprised what the WIAA limits. Yes Looney would lose eligibility for accepting any kind of gift.

When I was coaching stupid WIAA rules probably cost our team a state title and at the very least a state appearance because one of our players played in a church league softball event during the season. An opposing coach turned her in and she was ineligible for the remainder of the season.


Including the pizza? What about using someone elses garage to fix his car? Or washing their car?

http://www.cbssports.com/golf/eye-on-golf/22327295/a-studentathlete-washing-her-car-at-college-is-not-an-ncaa-violation

What is the limitations as far as the WIAA is concerned? Just no cash? We played in 3 on 3 tournaments in high school and never got in any trouble for it. Teams won prizes all the time. But not cash.


I know coaches that got in trouble for giving their players a carton of milk for drawing a charge and players that were in trouble for accepting things like that.

I'm not sure accepting prizes at a 3 on 3 is legal and it's definitely illegal to play in a 3 on 3 tournament the same time you are in that varsity sports season.

I also don't think you can participate in punt pass and kick if you are a football player.
"If I caught 756, I'd take a sharpie out of my pocket and draw on asterisk on it then hand it to Barry for free."

? Rubenonfire
Quote 0 0
dawgstyle
john42 wrote:
dawgstyle wrote:
john42 wrote:
dawgstyle wrote:
john42 wrote:
dawgstyle wrote:
john42 wrote:
The WIAA makes very good money on the boys state basketball tournament and uses it to fund other state tournaments that don't make money. Should the WIAA be paying high school boys basketball players since they profit off them?



Ok, not that the WIAA and the NCAA are even remotely the same, but I will humor you. First, define "very good money."


The WIAA had a profit of close to $800,000 last year.

A total of 46 percent of the WIAA?s tournament revenue came from the state basketball tournament meaning the revenue from basketball was roughly 3.68 million dollars. I don't know the profit but considering gymnastics, swimming, baseball, golf, tennis, softball, cross country, and track and field each produced net losses for the WIAA, I would assume the profit is very nice in basketball.

If you feel college players should get over and above what they get already, I don't see how you can feel like high school basketball players shouldn't get paid. I guarantee a lot more high school athletes than college scholarship athletes go to bed hungry.


Does the WIAA prevent kids from accepting a free pizza from someone that enjoys watching the kids play? If Kevon Looney wanted to sell his autograph to a neighbor for $500, would the WIAA do anything about that? If someone takes one of the kids on a trip and pays their way, does the WIAA take away their opportunity to participate? Does the WIAA sell jerseys with particular kids school and number on it for profit?

85 Scholarship Kids created $51,000,000 in profit for Florida last year and you somehow plan to compare that to an unknown number of profit from the thousands of kids that played basketball in the state of WI.


You would be surprised what the WIAA limits. Yes Looney would lose eligibility for accepting any kind of gift.

When I was coaching stupid WIAA rules probably cost our team a state title and at the very least a state appearance because one of our players played in a church league softball event during the season. An opposing coach turned her in and she was ineligible for the remainder of the season.


Including the pizza? What about using someone elses garage to fix his car? Or washing their car?

http://www.cbssports.com/golf/eye-on-golf/22327295/a-studentathlete-washing-her-car-at-college-is-not-an-ncaa-violation

What is the limitations as far as the WIAA is concerned? Just no cash? We played in 3 on 3 tournaments in high school and never got in any trouble for it. Teams won prizes all the time. But not cash.


I know coaches that got in trouble for giving their players a carton of milk for drawing a charge and players that were in trouble for accepting things like that.

I'm not sure accepting prizes at a 3 on 3 is legal and it's definitely illegal to play in a 3 on 3 tournament the same time you are in that varsity sports season.

I also don't think you can participate in punt pass and kick if you are a football player.


I have never heard of any of these things, let alone seen them enforced. I actually quite stunned.
@2GuysFromWI

Harbaugh will have Urban Meyer retired from OSU by 2020.
Quote 0 0
bhsblackhawks
dawgstyle wrote:
john42 wrote:
dawgstyle wrote:
john42 wrote:
dawgstyle wrote:
john42 wrote:
dawgstyle wrote:
john42 wrote:
The WIAA makes very good money on the boys state basketball tournament and uses it to fund other state tournaments that don't make money. Should the WIAA be paying high school boys basketball players since they profit off them?



Ok, not that the WIAA and the NCAA are even remotely the same, but I will humor you. First, define "very good money."


The WIAA had a profit of close to $800,000 last year.

A total of 46 percent of the WIAA?s tournament revenue came from the state basketball tournament meaning the revenue from basketball was roughly 3.68 million dollars. I don't know the profit but considering gymnastics, swimming, baseball, golf, tennis, softball, cross country, and track and field each produced net losses for the WIAA, I would assume the profit is very nice in basketball.

If you feel college players should get over and above what they get already, I don't see how you can feel like high school basketball players shouldn't get paid. I guarantee a lot more high school athletes than college scholarship athletes go to bed hungry.


Does the WIAA prevent kids from accepting a free pizza from someone that enjoys watching the kids play? If Kevon Looney wanted to sell his autograph to a neighbor for $500, would the WIAA do anything about that? If someone takes one of the kids on a trip and pays their way, does the WIAA take away their opportunity to participate? Does the WIAA sell jerseys with particular kids school and number on it for profit?

85 Scholarship Kids created $51,000,000 in profit for Florida last year and you somehow plan to compare that to an unknown number of profit from the thousands of kids that played basketball in the state of WI.


You would be surprised what the WIAA limits. Yes Looney would lose eligibility for accepting any kind of gift.

When I was coaching stupid WIAA rules probably cost our team a state title and at the very least a state appearance because one of our players played in a church league softball event during the season. An opposing coach turned her in and she was ineligible for the remainder of the season.


Including the pizza? What about using someone elses garage to fix his car? Or washing their car?

http://www.cbssports.com/golf/eye-on-golf/22327295/a-studentathlete-washing-her-car-at-college-is-not-an-ncaa-violation

What is the limitations as far as the WIAA is concerned? Just no cash? We played in 3 on 3 tournaments in high school and never got in any trouble for it. Teams won prizes all the time. But not cash.


I know coaches that got in trouble for giving their players a carton of milk for drawing a charge and players that were in trouble for accepting things like that.

I'm not sure accepting prizes at a 3 on 3 is legal and it's definitely illegal to play in a 3 on 3 tournament the same time you are in that varsity sports season.

I also don't think you can participate in punt pass and kick if you are a football player.


I have never heard of any of these things, let alone seen them enforced. I actually quite stunned.

Luckily, the WIAA basically relies on schools to self-regulate or to tip off the WIAA if they notice another school breaking the rules. Otherwise, you'd see a lot more kids suspended due to stupid rules.
Quote 0 0
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