blade12
How much of this is going on around the state? Is it 2 kids in the whole state or is it 200 kids? Is this trend growing? Are there girls that do this? 

I am not talking about kids with academic/emotional/social issues repeating although to make it to 8th grade and then use those reasons seems rather late. Maybe it happens in 7th grade as well?? I am specifically talking about kids that pass 8th grade the first time, many with good to very good grades, but then a decision is made by the kid/parents to repeat 8th grade the next year. 

I have heard a couple of stories about in state kids in the last few days. It seems the common denominator is they are doing this is for athletic reasons.
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thecrackerjack
Can you share names?
Fear of the unknown is the greatest fear of all.
- Yvon Chouinard

@miedent 
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banks93
There is a West De Pere kid who moved to Appleton North and is repeating 8th grade.  AN also had another kid from Menasha transfer into the 8th grade.  Good to see they are finally keeping up with Kimberly and Oshkosh North.

Maybe they just wanted to drive to the first day of high school.
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safetysqueezepleezzee11
blade12 wrote:
How much of this is going on around the state? Is it 2 kids in the whole state or is it 200 kids? Is this trend growing? Are there girls that do this? 

I am not talking about kids with academic/emotional/social issues repeating although to make it to 8th grade and then use those reasons seems rather late. Maybe it happens in 7th grade as well?? I am specifically talking about kids that pass 8th grade the first time, many with good to very good grades, but then a decision is made by the kid/parents to repeat 8th grade the next year. 

I have heard a couple of stories about in state kids in the last few days. It seems the common denominator is they are doing this is for athletic reasons.
  I only recall the Diener cousins Travis and Drake?(Dick's son) doing this at Fondy. They went thru 8th in the Fondy public junior high, then redid 8th grade at a private religious school in St.Peter, I believe. I am sure others are doing this and unless or until the WIAA and the schools 'put' something in via age restrictions that put these kids in their soph year for athletic eligibility - it will continue. The other thing is tons of parents hold kids back an extra year(I know of some holding 2 years back for August birthdays), before they start Kindergarten. Don't know how this is stopped unless again AGE restrictions would kick in once they get to high school.
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blade12
thecrackerjack wrote:
Can you share names?


Names are not necessary. There is one high profile player that did it a few years ago and I am sort of wondering with his success has that influenced others to take the same path. 

When I heard some stories of other kids doing this it was of interest to me and I wondered how many kids are doing it and if it is happening in other areas around the state or only in areas with many schools to choose from.

Anyone know of any girls that do this? Seems like it is always boys.
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safetysqueezepleezzee11

  This reminds me of the kid who rode his motorcycle to school his last day of "8th grade" when I was in grade school. I was in 5th grade at the time and we found it odd and funny as kids. The guy was a stud football player in high school - all conference every year, but my freshman year he wasn't allowed to play football because he was too old. He turned 19 in his junior year - if I recall it was in March. He had twin brothers a year behind him and I remember asking them at football practice 'Where is Dave?'. One of them laughed and said he is too old. I didn't really grasp it at that time. Him being held back(flunking) was legit as he barely made it thru high school academically. Didn't hurt him at all as he is a multi-millionare today - he was a great mechanic and started 3 different businesses. Obviously, he didn't handle the money or paper work in those businesses! I have to think that even today, the guy wouldn't have been allowed to play football his senior year. I think he repeated 2 grades over the years(both in grade school).

I got to know this guy very well over the years and it was obvious he was dyslexic. He had a very hard time reading and comprehending. He wasnt really 'dumb'. There were NO programs for kids like this back in the 1950's. Kids were either sent to regular school OR they went to 'retarded' school(yes, that is what it was called in those days!) He found a way to live and work around his 'limitations' and turned out to have a tremendously sucessful life.

To see kids being held back or repeating grades today JUST for sports strikes me as "PARENTS LIVING THRU THEIR KIDS". No kid would EVER want to do this crapola.

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roadkill1
thecrackerjack wrote:
Can you share names?


Jerry Smith



RK
"So what is big is not always the Trout nor the Deer but the chance, the being there. And what is full is not necessarily the creel nor the freezer, but the memory." ~ Aldo Leopold
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wiscopetty
blade12 wrote:


Names are not necessary. There is one high profile player that did it a few years ago and I am sort of wondering with his success has that influenced others to take the same path. 

When I heard some stories of other kids doing this it was of interest to me and I wondered how many kids are doing it and if it is happening in other areas around the state or only in areas with many schools to choose from.

Anyone know of any girls that do this? Seems like it is always boys.
I'm not sure the same incentive is there for girls. Pro sports don't have the same allure for girls (less money, exposure, etc.). Couple that with a generally less competitive attitude toward girls' sports – which can be healthy in some cases – and parents are likely ambivalent toward holding their daughters back for athletic purposes.
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safetysqueezepleezzee11
thecrackerjack wrote:
Can you share names?
   I had heard that Greg Oden started high school at age 26, but I think that was hyperbole.
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banks93
safetysqueezepleezzee11 wrote:

  This reminds me of the kid who rode his motorcycle to school his last day of "8th grade" when I was in grade school. I was in 5th grade at the time and we found it odd and funny as kids. The guy was a stud football player in high school - all conference every year, but my freshman year he wasn't allowed to play football because he was too old. He turned 19 in his junior year - if I recall it was in March. He had twin brothers a year behind him and I remember asking them at football practice 'Where is Dave?'. One of them laughed and said he is too old. I didn't really grasp it at that time. Him being held back(flunking) was legit as he barely made it thru high school academically. Didn't hurt him at all as he is a multi-millionare today - he was a great mechanic and started 3 different businesses. Obviously, he didn't handle the money or paper work in those businesses! I have to think that even today, the guy wouldn't have been allowed to play football his senior year. I think he repeated 2 grades over the years(both in grade school).

I got to know this guy very well over the years and it was obvious he was dyslexic. He had a very hard time reading and comprehending. He wasnt really 'dumb'. There were NO programs for kids like this back in the 1950's. Kids were either sent to regular school OR they went to 'retarded' school(yes, that is what it was called in those days!) He found a way to live and work around his 'limitations' and turned out to have a tremendously sucessful life.

To see kids being held back or repeating grades today JUST for sports strikes me as "PARENTS LIVING THRU THEIR KIDS". No kid would EVER want to do this crapola.

 

Yes, it has been my experience the last 8 years in youth sports that parents are starting kids later in kindergarten and Pre K school for and advantage.  The purpose could be to have a more mature kid that is better able to do school work but it also can correlate to sports success later on. 

Baseball is the only sport that kind of tries to prevent it.  You can still see in the Little League world series the 180lb 13 year old dominating 11 and 12 year olds.

Football and Basketball kind of encourage it with no rules and play in your grade.  It is a huge advantage of speed, size and coordination when it happens.  It should hopefully even itself out but the kid who gets and extra year is an advantage.

It would be interesting for the WIAA board to do some statistics on state teams and the ages of the kids on the team.  Is that Freshman starting on Varsity 16 or 14?

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blade12
I wasn't trying to touch on kids that delay entry to kindergarten or even a kid being held back in 1st and 2nd grade. Many times those things happen because a kid just isn't ready emotionally or mature enough or even academically.

I am specifically talking about holding kids back to repeat 8th grade or maybe I could expand to say middle school  where I would think the maturity and academic reasons have been diminished and sorted out by that age.
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blade12
wiscopetty wrote:
I'm not sure the same incentive is there for girls. Pro sports don't have the same allure for girls (less money, exposure, etc.). Couple that with a generally less competitive attitude toward girls' sports – which can be healthy in some cases – and parents are likely ambivalent toward holding their daughters back for athletic purposes.

I take it you suspect (as I do) that the main reason for holding a kid back in middle school is for sports?  
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banks93
blade12 wrote:
I wasn't trying to touch on kids that delay entry to kindergarten late or even a kid being held back in 1st and 2nd grade. Many times those things happen because a kid just isn't ready emotionally or mature enough or even academically.

I am specifically talking about holding kids back to repeat 8th grade or maybe I could expand to say middle school  where I would think the maturity and academic reasons have been diminished and sorted out by that age.


You would be missing a huge portion of the kids and parents who are doing the same thing but just doing it earlier than you would be looking at it.
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blade12
banks93 wrote:


You would be missing a huge portion of the kids and parents who are doing the same thing but just doing it earlier than you would be looking at it.


Are there really that many parents that hold a 5 year old back to repeat kindergarten thinking he/she will one day be a HS sports star 10 years down the road? Is it really happening then?  I suppose it could and I know parents with especially boys (mature later) with July or Aug birthdays sometimes have to make that decision but I believe it is usually based on maturity not future sports potential. Maybe I am wrong?
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banks93
blade12 wrote:


Are there really that many parents that hold a 5 year old back to repeat kindergarten thinking he/she will one day be a HS sports star 10 years down the road? Is it really happening then?  I suppose it could and I know parents with especially boys (mature later) with July or Aug birthdays sometimes have to make that decision but I believe it is usually based on maturity not future sports potential. Maybe I am wrong?


Parents are not repeating a grade they are just starting the kid later.  I would say that happens 1000 to 1 more than 8th grade repeating.  30-40 years ago a kid only got held back because of grades or maybe naughty and maturity.  It is pretty much standard practice now for kids starting later.  A 14 year old freshman is rare. 

Tee ball starts at 6 years old and most basketball has Kindergarten 3 on 3.  8u AAU basketball.  If you want to give someone your money to tell you that your kid is a superstar they will take it.
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