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mrmike527
coldfeet09 wrote:


Mr_mike527 wrote:


coldfeet09 wrote:


For The Win wrote:


Well right now i'm going to be a senior in high school, so college is right around the bend. I made a promise to myself to get out of Wisconsin wherever I go to college (I want to have a different experience than what I've had here). It's not that I don't like Wisconsin but there's a need for me to get out.

ANYWAYS, anyone have helpful hints or tips about budgeting or schools...anything would be helpful. I've actually narrowed down my list to the University of Georgia, Texas, Florida, or the University of Arizona.

Thanks everyone


OP, one of the things that people never talk about when chosing a college deals with what employeers recruit at your school. If you go to UW-Madison, there will be hundreds of employeers who will show up on campus, do interviews, collect resumes, advertise jobs, etc. In the Midwest, you could only do better at Northwestern and Michigan.

The University of Northern Ill. has a nice location with being just west of Chicago. So I'm sure there would be plenty of Chicago businesses that would visit the campus.

If you want to go into engineering, two very good programs in the Midwest is at UW-Madison and Purdue.

If you want to go into nursing, just go to the nearest school and get the schooling done with.

If you want to go into medical school, you can attend any school, but location will matter for what activites you can take part in.

The bigger school you go to, the more competition you will have, but the more opportunities you will have (most large schools are located by bigger cities).


You're right. You could only do better at Northwestern and Michigan. Never mind the University of Chicago (probably the most prestigious school in the Midwest) or Notre Dame or Washington University in St. Louis.

You seem to know nothing about schools. You're just throwing out random statements without any knowledge. Location will matter for medical school as to what activities you can take part in? You clearly don't have the slightest clue of what you're talking about. If you're going the classic route to being a doctor, location pretty much means aboslutely nothing. You are doing a Pre-Med undergraduate degree. You're not doing any graduate work, and you're not doing your residency. That means it doesn't matter much at all what opportunities are available to you in the surrounding areas.

If you want to be a doctor, you want to go to a nicer school because it will be easier to get into Med School. You can absolutely go to a school like Eau Claire or LaCrosse if you want to be a doctor. But if you want to get into a good Med School, you better excell at those places and be involved in the community.


And its hilarious that you can't even think of the name of your supposed "top small school in Massachusettes." Sorry coldfeet, that is not clear. Harvard is the best known private school. MIT is a smaller school which is incredibly well known. Williams is probably the top Liberal Arts school in the country, but you could just as easily make the case for Amherst. Take any one of those schools, and its still ridiculous to put it in with the schools you associated it with.


I will give you Notre Dame. They should be included. University of Ill. Chicago isn't as prestigous as you may think.

You must be some 17 year old kid who thinks he knows everything. I've been through a pre-med program. I know the ins and outs of everything there is in that path. If you go to Stevens Point for college, you won't have the same type of research opportunities as you would at UW-Madison (the same for Eau Claire, Green Bay, Osh Kosh, etc...........THAT DOENS'T MEAN YOU CANT GO TO THOSE SCHOOLS AND NOT GET INTO A MEDICAL SCHOOL.....HECK, THE TOP STUDENT IN THE MED SCHOOL CLASS AT MADISON TWO YEARS AGO WAS FROM OSH KOSH). Hell, UW-Madison won't allow students from other colleges TO go there and do research outside of the summer research programs. It is you who knows nothing about this process. And like heck location doesn't matter, you fool. Tell me know many free clinics is located in small college towns compared to larger college towns? I never said the school matters as far as gaining admissions to a medical school. What I did say is that LOCATION does matter when it comes to the opportunities you have.

Know what the heck you are talking about before posting.


You're a fool. What research, exactly, will you be doing at your undergraduate school? How many free clinics are located in small college towns? It isn't a factor! Sure, you'll get some experience from volunteering at a free clinic. But who cares? You're not researching or doing anything in depth. Its your undergraduate. The only factor that you should consider in your undergraduate is how you can get into Grad school. Its easier to get into Med School when you go to a nicer undergraduate.

But that's the only factor other than whether you like the school that is really a major consideration. Are you really going to research anything at UW Madison during your undergraduate? And if you are, is that going to make a major difference for your graduate school? No, its not. That's the idiocy in what you're saying.
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cameroncrazies02
It's really your own opinion. Your best bet is go and visit a wide variety of colleges. We can sit here and tell you where to go or where not to go, but in reality we all only went to one college. We may have gone and partied at a couple other schools a few times or transferred from one to another, but we really, truely only know the structure and true positives and negatives of one school.

I can sit here and tell you what's good and bad about UWM, but what do I know? I'm only in the School of Social Welfare, have only walked through the business school a handful of times, mainly to get out of the cold, and have a completely different view of what a positive is and what a negative is of UWM than you would. I can tell you the bar scenes cool, the house parties are okay and can tell you a lot about the dorms, but what if your main concerns are distance from one class to another, structure of classes, price, etc?

Like I said, go and visit schools. My sister visited 4 different schools when she was a senior in high school 7 years ago and got probably the best view any high school senior could get. That's your best opportunity.

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Quote 0 0
hickorycornhusker
coldfeet09 wrote:


Mr_mike527 wrote:


coldfeet09 wrote:


For The Win wrote:


Well right now i'm going to be a senior in high school, so college is right around the bend. I made a promise to myself to get out of Wisconsin wherever I go to college (I want to have a different experience than what I've had here). It's not that I don't like Wisconsin but there's a need for me to get out.

ANYWAYS, anyone have helpful hints or tips about budgeting or schools...anything would be helpful. I've actually narrowed down my list to the University of Georgia, Texas, Florida, or the University of Arizona.

Thanks everyone


OP, one of the things that people never talk about when chosing a college deals with what employeers recruit at your school. If you go to UW-Madison, there will be hundreds of employeers who will show up on campus, do interviews, collect resumes, advertise jobs, etc. In the Midwest, you could only do better at Northwestern and Michigan.

The University of Northern Ill. has a nice location with being just west of Chicago. So I'm sure there would be plenty of Chicago businesses that would visit the campus.

If you want to go into engineering, two very good programs in the Midwest is at UW-Madison and Purdue.

If you want to go into nursing, just go to the nearest school and get the schooling done with.

If you want to go into medical school, you can attend any school, but location will matter for what activites you can take part in.

The bigger school you go to, the more competition you will have, but the more opportunities you will have (most large schools are located by bigger cities).


You're right. You could only do better at Northwestern and Michigan. Never mind the University of Chicago (probably the most prestigious school in the Midwest) or Notre Dame or Washington University in St. Louis.

You seem to know nothing about schools. You're just throwing out random statements without any knowledge. Location will matter for medical school as to what activities you can take part in? You clearly don't have the slightest clue of what you're talking about. If you're going the classic route to being a doctor, location pretty much means aboslutely nothing. You are doing a Pre-Med undergraduate degree. You're not doing any graduate work, and you're not doing your residency. That means it doesn't matter much at all what opportunities are available to you in the surrounding areas.

If you want to be a doctor, you want to go to a nicer school because it will be easier to get into Med School. You can absolutely go to a school like Eau Claire or LaCrosse if you want to be a doctor. But if you want to get into a good Med School, you better excell at those places and be involved in the community.


And its hilarious that you can't even think of the name of your supposed "top small school in Massachusettes." Sorry coldfeet, that is not clear. Harvard is the best known private school. MIT is a smaller school which is incredibly well known. Williams is probably the top Liberal Arts school in the country, but you could just as easily make the case for Amherst. Take any one of those schools, and its still ridiculous to put it in with the schools you associated it with.


I will give you Notre Dame. They should be included. University of Ill. Chicago isn't as prestigous as you may think.

You must be some 17 year old kid who thinks he knows everything. I've been through a pre-med program. I know the ins and outs of everything there is in that path. If you go to Stevens Point for college, you won't have the same type of research opportunities as you would at UW-Madison (the same for Eau Claire, Green Bay, Osh Kosh, etc...........THAT DOENS'T MEAN YOU CANT GO TO THOSE SCHOOLS AND NOT GET INTO A MEDICAL SCHOOL.....HECK, THE TOP STUDENT IN THE MED SCHOOL CLASS AT MADISON TWO YEARS AGO WAS FROM OSH KOSH). Hell, UW-Madison won't allow students from other colleges TO go there and do research outside of the summer research programs. It is you who knows nothing about this process. And like heck location doesn't matter, you fool. Tell me know many free clinics is located in small college towns compared to larger college towns? I never said the school matters as far as gaining admissions to a medical school. What I did say is that LOCATION does matter when it comes to the opportunities you have.

Know what the heck you are talking about before posting.


The University of Chicago and the University of Illinois-Chicago are two completely different schools. You're right in saying that UIC isn't that prestigious. But Mr. Mike wasn't talking about UIC. He was talking about the University of Chicago which is associated with 82 Nobel Laureates. Last year Forbes ranked the undergraduate program 4th in the nation behind Yale, Harvard and Princeton. It is a leading research university in this country associated with all the research universities of the Big Ten Conference through the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (aka The Academic Big Ten).
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JaCeLo3_old
For The Win wrote:


Well right now i'm going to be a senior in high school, so college is right around the bend. I made a promise to myself to get out of Wisconsin wherever I go to college (I want to have a different experience than what I've had here). It's not that I don't like Wisconsin but there's a need for me to get out.

ANYWAYS, anyone have helpful hints or tips about budgeting or schools...anything would be helpful. I've actually narrowed down my list to the University of Georgia, Texas, Florida, or the University of Arizona.

Thanks everyone


Well, what do you plan on majoring in?
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hoopsgalore

When I was at Arizona State, I made a couple of weekend trips down to Tuscon and it was a fun time. Of course the weather is beautiful year round, but the campus was awesome too. It felt like I was on a vacation and the girls there were... wow. I've been to some big universities around the country and I must say that Arizona had the best looking girls from what I saw.
Playboy actually just ranked Arizona #5 on their party school list. It seems to be overtaking Arizona State as the elite party school in Arizona that is known.
Just an overall nice campus with a lot of palm trees.
Fans are very passionate about their sports down there, whether or not U of A is good.
Not sure if you'll see the tailgating/pre-game parties your used to in Madison during football season, but your bound to get wasted anyways.

I know nothing academically about U of A, so I can't help you there.
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mrmike527
coldfeet09 wrote:


1: Clinical research.....student jobs, full-time employment, network with doctors (LORs from some of the top in their field))
2: Bench research...student jobs, full-time employment, network with scientists (LORs from some of the top people in their field)
3: Volunteer opportunities..........tell me one small college town that can allow you to work as a research assistant as a paid job, a student job doing clinical research assistant type of work, another job as a patient chart abstractor, volunteer as a crises phone counselor, shadowing doctors, being involved with the local ambulence companies....all in a week worth of work.

LOCATION MATTERS FOR OPPORTUNITIES.

Med schools do have a formula they use to calculate your GPA based on where you went to college. For instance, a student that went to Cornell that got a cGPA of 3.85 will look more favoriable than a person from UW-Stevens Point with a 3.40. A 0.2 will be put onto the Cornell student's GPA. Now, a 3.4 cGPA from Stevens Point is just below the national average for med school admittance. Like I said before, you can still get into med school from that type of school. BUT YOU WON'T HAVE THE SAME TYPE OF OPPORTUNITIES. THIS MEANS YOU CAN GET A STRONGER APPLICATION AT A LARGER SCHOOL.

You need the following to be a strong applicant:

Good GPA
MCAT (30+)
Clinical experience
Shadowing
Volunteering
Leadership
Research (bench or clinic)



What opportunities are you talking about? Its not like your undergrad is going to be important to help you get a job if you're planning on going into graduate school and a residency. What do you need? Clinical experience? If you think that's important, you can get that at any clinic which lets you work. Its not like a school big enough to have a Pre-Med program is going to be in a city without a clinic or hospital. The MCAT? Not related to location of school. Shadowing? Again, if your school has a medical school, its not like you're not going to find someone to shadow with. Hell, you could even go to your hometown and shadow. Volunteering? Can be done anywhere. Leadership? Anywhere. Research? Come on. You don't do extensive research for your undergrad. The big research schools are the ones who do research in their graduate programs.

Besides, the size of the school has absolutely nothing to do with the program. If you go to Williams in Massachusettes, its going to be much easier to get into a nice med school than if you go to Minnesota-Twin Cities. U of M is a very large State school in a very large city. Williams is a small private school in a small city.

Location and size mean almost nothing. Prestige is important and can help you out. What you're saying though is that you need to pick a school in the right area for what you want to do, and that's generally unimportant for your undergrad.

If you're deciding between An Ivy League school and UW-Lacrosse, go to the Ivy League school. But if you're worried about going to one similar school over another based on location or size, its dumb. Go to the school that you like the most. Obviously, if you're looking at Community College vs. a Top-25 University, you're going to choose the Top-25 University. But when you're talking the University of Minnesota vs. UW-EC, the University of Wisconsin vs. Northwestern, or similar choices that a normal college applicant is more likely to face, its not the size or location that's important.
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paladium
hoopsgalore wrote:


When I was at Arizona State, I made a couple of weekend trips down to Tuscon and it was a fun time. Of course the weather is beautiful year round, but the campus was awesome too. It felt like I was on a vacation and the girls there were... wow. I've been to some big universities around the country and I must say that Arizona had the best looking girls from what I saw.
Playboy actually just ranked Arizona #5 on their party school list. It seems to be overtaking Arizona State as the elite party school in Arizona that is known.
Just an overall nice campus with a lot of palm trees.
Fans are very passionate about their sports down there, whether or not U of A is good.
Not sure if you'll see the tailgating/pre-game parties your used to in Madison during football season, but your bound to get wasted anyways.

I know nothing academically about U of A, so I can't help you there.




I did the same when I was at ASU... After visiting I still prefer ASU to U of A, but that could just be personal preference.
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Ibankatchase_old
Ok, I am an out of state student at the U of A and just want to give a little insight about Tucson and the U. First off Tucson, is somewhat of a dirty place compared to Phoenix which is very clean, but the further north you get in Tucson into the foothills which has very expensive homes and is a lot cleaner. The campus itself is very clean and there's really not very much you need to go off campus to do as it has possibly everything needed: shopping, restaurants, movie theather, and oh yea sports. The city of tucson revolves around the U, and sports here are a huge deal. The basketball team is usually good even though we've had rough patches these past years and even though the football team hasn't been the best the student section at games are packed and we have the largest student section in the Pac10. The campus is beautiful especially for midwest/eastcoast kids who aren't use to all the palm trees, and the girls here are gorgeous...blonde hair, blue eyed anyone? It is hot, don't get me wrong but it's a dry heat and more heat=less clothes. Arizona is a party school, there's a party everyday of the week, but the academics here are also good. It doesn't have the reputation of the...if you have a pulse you can get in rep of ASU up north. Im not saying that it is a USC type elite school because as long as you had good grades through high school you can pretty much get in but it's a lot harder to finish school. I know a lot of kids their freshmen year flunk out because they couldn't handle partying and balancing their school work. College is what you make of it whether you go to an in-state school or out of state, there's partying and there's a lot of studying. Though I would recommend going somewhere near where you are planning to live after college in case of job offers or what not.
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spike64
"I will give you Notre Dame. They should be included. University of Ill. Chicago isn't as prestigous as you may think.

You must be some 17 year old kid who thinks he knows everything. I've been through a pre-med program. I know the ins and outs of everything there is in that path. If you go to Stevens Point for college, you won't have the same type of research opportunities as you would at UW-Madison (the same for Eau Claire, Green Bay, Osh Kosh, etc...........THAT DOENS'T MEAN YOU CANT GO TO THOSE SCHOOLS AND NOT GET INTO A MEDICAL SCHOOL.....HECK, THE TOP STUDENT IN THE MED SCHOOL CLASS AT MADISON TWO YEARS AGO WAS FROM OSH KOSH). Hell, UW-Madison won't allow students from other colleges TO go there and do research outside of the summer research programs. It is you who knows nothing about this process. And like heck location doesn't matter, you fool. Tell me know many free clinics is located in small college towns compared to larger college towns? I never said the school matters as far as gaining admissions to a medical school. What I did say is that LOCATION does matter when it comes to the opportunities you have.

Know what the heck you are talking about before posting. "

Have to defend my school... Oshkosh is one word. Idk where the city of Osh Kosh is...
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takedown918_old
You say you want to go out of state to experience a new city? If so, you might want to look for a school in a large city. A lot of these state schools that you listed are going to be college towns. They are all similar. Austin, TX may be the only exception.

Washington, DC is probably one of the best cities in the country for a college student that wants the "big city life" with a hint of college atmosphere. This may be one of the youngest cities ever. One reason being is all of the interns. Many more are even staying after internships now due to the gentrification to the city. It's so fixed up and popular now that some are calling it the new "Hollywood of the East Coast". Tons of movies and tv shows are being filmed here all of a sudden. The Real World DC actually just started filming last week.(I ran by their house while they were outside just the other day)

The nightlife is nothing what I expected. I thought that this was going to be a town that was half government and half ghetto. I was definitely wrong. The nightlife gets pretty crazy and the neighborhoods here are so distinct that it changes greatly depending on where you are.

You can get around the city without a car very easily. The Metro(subway) is the nicest subway in the country, and the busiest behind NYC. Even the buses are very popular. It isn't slummy at all like Chicago's or NYC's. 80% of subway riders have a four-year degree and 50% of bus riders do.

Someone mentioned Georgetown and American. Both are very good schools. There are a lot more though. I think behind Boston, there are more colleges here for the size of the city than anywhere. Georgetown, American, George Washington, Howard, Catholic University of America, Galludet, and University of DC are a few of them inside city limits. There is also the University of Maryland three subway stops outside of the city. George Mason and several other schools are in VA. University of VA(one of the best public schools in the country) is about two hours out.

I think you might enjoy a larger city like DC, NYC, Chicago, or Boston better than a college town based on what you're saying.
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