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hueby
Just read another very good book on our history. This one is titled "Between Two Fires- American Indians in the Civil War" by Laurence M Hauptman. Published in 1995.

Again, learned things in this book I don't ever remember learning way back in school. The book covers various tribes and key Native American leaders who served for either the Union or Confederacy. With many of these tribes the author provides their history and covers many of the treaties and (corrept/illegal) methods used to take their lands and displace them.

Then you learn of their contributions to the war effort.

For the Union the book does mention the Oneidas who served with the 14th Wisconsin. For Michigan you have the famous 1st Michigan Sharpshooters which were mainly comprised of Ottawa & Ojibwa and some Delaware, Huron, Oneida and Potawatomi.

The 1st Michigan were led by a Franco-Ottawa named Garrett Graveraet. Company K of this unit had the NM Breechloaders which could fire 10 rounds per minute from the prone stationary position which was big at the time. The unit trained by hitting 2 painted figures on a canvas placed 600 yds away.

A number of the men from these units would be killed or captured in the Battle of the Crater.

You also learn about tribes like the Pequat who served within the 31st USCT.

Then you had the Pamunkey and the Lumbees. The Lumbees were a tribe down south who helped the Union. They were tired of the mistreatment. Some white Union soldiers escaped from a Confederate prison in Florence, SC and joined forces with the Lumbees. Under their leader Henry Berry Lowry, "The Lowry Party" conducted raids on the Southern targets, to include members of the North Carolina Home Guards and the Ku Klux Klan.

Some of the tribes serving for the Confereracy were from The Five Civilized Tribes of the Southeast (Cherokee, Creeks, Choctaw, Chickasaw and Seminoles), Cayuga, Seneca and Shawnee.

The Eastern Band of the Cherokees did a great job for the Confederacy in the Eastern Tennessee/North Carolina area. You learn about what they did.

You learn about famous Confederate Generals like Stand Waite- who before the war signed the Treaty of New Echota which surrendered Cherokee ancestorial land. Unlike the other Tribal leaders who signed the treaty, he survived assassination attempts because under the Cherokee "Law of Blood" it allowed for execution of those who sell their land.

But the Cherokee Nation would flourish under a man named Ross who rivaled Waite. Ross would become Chief of the Cherokee Nation and by 1860 the Cherokee had 102,000 acres under cultivation, 240,000 cattle, 20,000 horses and mules, 15,000 hogs and ready for this?....4,000 slaves!

The author states near the end of the book how "Indian Removal" was the main reason Native Americans fought for one side or the other. They hoped by being in good standing and helping "The Country" they could finally be left alone. Yes some did it for the money (were in poverty) and adventure, but for the leaders it meant the survival of their people.

The author credits one tribe for serving for "Patriotic" reasons- those were Catawba of South Carolina. 2/3rds of the population in South Carolina were slaves, and the Catawbas were used to "terrorize" the slave population and capture any runaways, as whites feared possible rebellions.

Loyal to South Carolina, about 120 Catawbas fought for the Confederates. Like some of the tribes mentioned, the Catawbas were almost wiped out by the English during the Colonial Times when the British attacked their villages and killed hundreds of non-combatants.

Lots of American history in this book! Apologize I got carried away!
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hueby
If I could throw out there one more book I just finished reading. Again if you enjoy learning about our country's history and the Civil War (Which in this book it is referred to as "The War Between the States") this book is again "a shocker."

It is also about Southern History and African American History. Through many documents, war records, letters that survived the war, newspaper articles, military pensions, etc this book is a collection of information that supports African American's contribution to the Confederacy in the book "Black Confederates" by Charles Kelly Barrow, J.H. Segars and R.B. Rosenberg.

You will learn a part of history that has been largely ignored / omitted in the classroom. Many of these men served in support roles like teamsters, musicians, laborers, hospital stewards, cooks, body guards, etc but in many occasions fought along side their white Confederate comrades (where in Union units they were segregated).

There were many slaves who did serve as servants to their masters. If their masters were wounded they would nurse them back to health. If the master was killed they would retrieve the body from the battlefield and oversee the body back home for burial. Most were often quick to defend and fight against a Union invader.

The book also mentions numerous slaves who refused to leave their homes (You realize there was no mass exodus of slaves leaving the South).

Many of these men were loyal to the South. The book will explain this to the reader.

A very educational and informative book! A must read- it will open your eyes.
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iwishiwasaballer
Finished reading Life in the Past Lane: A History of Stock Car Racing in Northeast Wisconsin from 1950-1980 by Joe Verdegan a couple of days ago. I enjoyed the book. Even though the timespan covered was before I was alive I was familiar with many of the names and it was interesting reading about the way things were in those days.
2017 WSN HOF Inductee
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sam20
Just read the Chipper Jones, Ballplayer book. Great read, couldn't put it down, even if you aren't a Braves fan you'll like it, really entertaining book. Talks a lot about his personal life. Also Jane Leavy's books on Sandy Koufax and Mickey Mantle are terrific reads as well. Want to read the Rick Ankiel book soon as well, waiting for the price to come down.
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wiscopetty
Just finished "Hero of the Empire" by Candice Millard. Miillard does an excellent job of recounting Winston Churchill's time as a soldier and POW during the Boer War at the turn of the 20th century.
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ash22themagnificent
I'm a sucker for sports stories (local, college, or pro) that are well known or not and finished "The Amazing Journey of the Kickapoo Kids" by Paul Lagan the other day. The book came out almost two years ago. This is one story that deserves a lot more attention.
"For some players, luck itself is an art."

"They say you're a man of vision."

"Welcome to NASCAR. Where the rules are made up and the points don't matter."

"What would you sell your freedom for?"
"Some Knicks tickets."
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wiscopetty
I was able to get quite a bit of reading done this summer:
  • First two parts of Edmund Morris’s Teddy Roosevelt series
  • “The Best Land Under Heaven” by Michael Wallis
  • “Killers of the Flower Moon” by David Grann
  • “Hero of the Empire” by Candice Millard
  • “Empire of the Summer Moon” by S.C. Gwynne
  • “Blood and Thunder: The Epic Story of Kit Carson and the Conquest of the American West” by Hampton Sides
  • “Ali” by Jonathan Eig
  • “Encounters at the Heart of the World: A History of the Mandan People” by Elizabeth Fenn

At some point, I would like to finish Morris's Roosevelt series. "Empire of the Summer Moon" has been criticized by some historians, but nonetheless it's an entertaining account of the Comanche wars in Texas and the life of Quanah Parker. I would recommend Millard's book if you're interested in a lightly covered part of Winston Churchill's life. "Blood and Thunder" splits its time between the life of Kit Carson and the diminution of the Navajo people in the Four Corners region. Eig's new biography of Ali is all-encompassing and a quick read. And "Encounters at the Heart of the World" is a fully fleshed out history of the Mandan people in their ancestral homeland in North and South Dakota, as well as their relationship with white traders and nearby tribes (Arikara, Sioux, etc.)

I am currently making my way through "Washington: A Life" by Ron Chernow, and am eagerly waiting delivery of Chernow's new biography of Ulysses S. Grant from the library (sorry Squeeze).
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safetysqueezepleezzee11
"Inside Studio 54" - Mark Fleishman - pretty good read, alot of name dropping. Might not be that interesting for those that didnt live thru the time period, but I found it facinating. Mostly covers the pre-AIDS time period of Studio 54.

"Sticky Fingers" - Joe Hagan - a biography of the creator of magazine Rolling Stone - Jann Wenner.  Again a 'time period' book that may not interest those younger.

I suspect Mick would enjoy both of these.

"Lenin" - Victor Sebestyen - fascinating biography of Lenin from birth to death. This author was the first to have access to soviet archives that opened up this material.

"Cheating Is Encouraged" - Mike Siani 'plus others' - biography of the Oakland Raiders thru the 1970's by former Raider wide receiver Mike Siani. A very easy, funny and interesting read for those who followed pro football thru the 1970's.
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safetysqueezepleezzee11
wiscopetty wrote:
I was able to get quite a bit of reading done this summer:
  • First two parts of Edmund Morris’s Teddy Roosevelt series
  • “The Best Land Under Heaven” by Michael Wallis
  • “Killers of the Flower Moon” by David Grann
  • “Hero of the Empire” by Candice Millard
  • “Empire of the Summer Moon” by S.C. Gwynne
  • “Blood and Thunder: The Epic Story of Kit Carson and the Conquest of the American West” by Hampton Sides
  • “Ali” by Jonathan Eig
  • “Encounters at the Heart of the World: A History of the Mandan People” by Elizabeth Fenn

At some point, I would like to finish Morris's Roosevelt series. "Killers of the Flower Moon" has been criticized by some historians, but nonetheless it's an entertaining account of the Comanche wars in Texas and the life of Quanah Parker. I would recommend Millard's book if you're interested in a lightly covered part of Winston Churchill's life. "Blood and Thunder" splits its time between the life of Kit Carson and the diminution of the Navajo people in the Four Corners region. Eig's new biography of Ali is all-encompassing and a quick read. And "Encounters at the Heart of the World" is a fully fleshed out history of the Mandan people in their ancestral homeland in North and South Dakota, as well as their relationship with white traders and nearby tribes (Arikara, Sioux, etc.)

I am currently making my way through "Washington: A Life" by Ron Chernow, and am eagerly waiting delivery of Chernow's new biography of Ulysses S. Grant from the library (sorry Squeeze).
   I have actually read most of Chernow's books. After I went back and read his first one - "House of Morgan" then followed that with "Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller Sr" I realized how slanted he was in his biographies. His books are all 'good reads', but he simply doesn't write biographies in a neutral way. I have actually read most of them and also listened to them on CD. I will probably read/listen to the US Grant book at some time, but I can only take so much of  'Chernow' at one time. One wouldn't probably pick up on this if you haven't read multiple biographies that others wrote on the same people. He has his slant and that is fine.
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ash22themagnificent
PLACE NAMES OF WISCONSIN by Edward Callary - For those who love history such in state and the origins of towns and even counties is really interesting to discover.
"For some players, luck itself is an art."

"They say you're a man of vision."

"Welcome to NASCAR. Where the rules are made up and the points don't matter."

"What would you sell your freedom for?"
"Some Knicks tickets."
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db11
Betrayal In Berlin by Steve Vogel.

Tells the tale of the U.S.'s tapping into phone lines in East Berlin in 1955 and how they were betrayed from the outset by MI6 agent (and Soviet spy George Blake), yet the Soviets let it go on for almost a year anyway.

The second half of the book deals with Blake's escape from a UK prison and making his way behind the Iron Curtain.

Rating: 4.25/5
https://twitter.com/barwickipedia - Follow me. Because we all need a bit of sports snark in our lives.

"Doin' right ain't got no end."
-The Outlaw Josey Wales

"'Allegedly' is right, Mr. Polian. I have a hole in my ear drum, I'd never go for a swim, no matter how drunk me is."
-Pat McAfee
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diener34
Can I Say by Travis Barker

Its an autobiography from the drummer of Aquabats, Blink 182, Transplants, Box Car Racer, and a feature on many solo artists tracks.

It was a nice easy light read.  4/5
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