theoldroller
I originally posted this in the Northern Lakes board, but thought i would post it here as well. A little piece of Wisconsin baseball history.
[/i]
As I promised. I had to go through some old scrapbooks to find this, but I found the [i]MILWUAKEE JOURNAL
article with all the pertinent numbers in it. (As you can guess by the dates involved, there are no online copies of the article, although I may someday transcribe it. This is mostly my writing, but Tom Enlund of the Journal wrote the article from which I'm culling stats and quotes.)

---------
In the eternally youthful spring of 1981, two Northern Lakes Conference baseball teams met beneath a steely gray Langlade County sky in an epic battle that would redefine the game of...alright, the truth is that the game was just plain strange. "It all sounds odd," Wabeno baseball coach Ron Swanson told the Journal, "But if you were at the game and saw how everything piled up, you'd understand."

The final score was Wabeno 35 and White lake 24. The game lasted only six innings--but took over 3 1/2 hours to play. The after school game was finally called by virtue of the ten run rule, at about eight o'clock in the evening!

I remember that at one point in about the fourth inning, the base umpire collapsed to the ground with a back spasm. I honest to God thought he had died of a heart attack! He dropped like a sack of frozen cantaloupes, with a disgusting thud and not a lot of bounce. Turns out it wouldn't be the strangest thing I saw all day.

"We'd get up by 16 or 17 runs, and they'd get back to eight or nine and we'd have to keep going," said Swanson. "Finally, after the sixth we had a big enough lead to end it."

White Lake coach, George Maule, however thinks his team might have been able to win if a seventh inning would have been played. "As it was going--back and forth--if we'd have gone another inning, who knows?" he said.

HERE'S MY FAVORITE SENTENCE FROM ENLUND'S ARTICLE: Both coaches agreed that the game was not fundamentally sound. Ya think? The two teams combined for 22 errors--that's the offical book. I was a freshman keeping the visiting book, and I had it at 25 errors, but I was always cheap about giving out hits that aren't really hits! The four White Lake pitchers walked 21 batters, and the three Wabeno pitchers walked 17. (38 walks for those of you who are mathematically challenged.) Swanny sent sophomore Bill Schlafke to the mound with the instruction to "just throw a strike." The speed didn't matter. We just wanted anything but another walk. Bill's a friend of mine, but I have to tell ya. He wasn't out there very long!

For the Logrollers, senior Steve Johnson had four hits and Mike Hill had two hits and scored five runs. For the Lakers, Terry Farrand and Tom Conto scored SIX RUNS EACH!

White Lake led 10-6 after three and 17-11 after four. But in the fifth, Wabeno sent 20 batters to the plate and scored 16 runs. Wabeno put another eight runs up in the top of the sixth to pull way out ahead, but White Lake came back in the bottom of the inning and almost sent the game into the seventh inning.

Wabeno had just brought baseball back a few years earlier, and did not have any Little League program at the time. We really were not very experienced. White Lake was almost all freshmen and sophomores at the time, with a handful of juniors who had decided to come out for the first time.

SCORING RECORDS:
White Lake scored 24 runs in a losing cause...ranked 1st nationally. "It's quite a dubious distinction," remarked Maule.
The two teams combined for 59 runs...ranked 3rd nationally. In 1977 Dufor, Oregon beat Cascade Falls 63-3; in 1925, Safford, Arizona beat Tucson Indian School 56-6. I always noted that ours was the only game where both teams were fairly competitive and the score was "natural" instead of someone trying to humiliate someone else. Most likely, ours was the only one of the three played under a ten-run mercy rule as well.

I have kept no track of records since then. It doesn't matter. This was our moment, frozen in time. We didn't even realize that it was any type of record until several days later. but we'll always remember the collapsing ump, Swanny and Maule searching up and down the dugouts for someone--ANYONE--who could throw a strike. The two coaches--good friends, by the way--out on the field arguing calls and trying not to laugh or cry about the whole thing. Maybe it doesn't compare to any of the State championships won by the conference, but in a way--it was one of the NLC's most historic moments...and it was FUN! Enjoy the moments, kids. Enjoy 'em all.


Quote 0 0
thegreat1
Quote:
ORIGINAL: TheOldRoller

I originally posted this in the Northern Lakes board, but thought i would post it here as well. A little piece of Wisconsin baseball history.
[/i]
As I promised. I had to go through some old scrapbooks to find this, but I found the [i]MILWUAKEE JOURNAL
article with all the pertinent numbers in it. (As you can guess by the dates involved, there are no online copies of the article, although I may someday transcribe it. This is mostly my writing, but Tom Enlund of the Journal wrote the article from which I'm culling stats and quotes.)

---------
In the eternally youthful spring of 1981, two Northern Lakes Conference baseball teams met beneath a steely gray Langlade County sky in an epic battle that would redefine the game of...alright, the truth is that the game was just plain strange. "It all sounds odd," Wabeno baseball coach Ron Swanson told the Journal, "But if you were at the game and saw how everything piled up, you'd understand."

The final score was Wabeno 35 and White lake 24. The game lasted only six innings--but took over 3 1/2 hours to play. The after school game was finally called by virtue of the ten run rule, at about eight o'clock in the evening!

I remember that at one point in about the fourth inning, the base umpire collapsed to the ground with a back spasm. I honest to God thought he had died of a heart attack! He dropped like a sack of frozen cantaloupes, with a disgusting thud and not a lot of bounce. Turns out it wouldn't be the strangest thing I saw all day.

"We'd get up by 16 or 17 runs, and they'd get back to eight or nine and we'd have to keep going," said Swanson. "Finally, after the sixth we had a big enough lead to end it."

White Lake coach, George Maule, however thinks his team might have been able to win if a seventh inning would have been played. "As it was going--back and forth--if we'd have gone another inning, who knows?" he said.

HERE'S MY FAVORITE SENTENCE FROM ENLUND'S ARTICLE: Both coaches agreed that the game was not fundamentally sound. Ya think? The two teams combined for 22 errors--that's the offical book. I was a freshman keeping the visiting book, and I had it at 25 errors, but I was always cheap about giving out hits that aren't really hits! The four White Lake pitchers walked 21 batters, and the three Wabeno pitchers walked 17. (38 walks for those of you who are mathematically challenged.) Swanny sent sophomore Bill Schlafke to the mound with the instruction to "just throw a strike." The speed didn't matter. We just wanted anything but another walk. Bill's a friend of mine, but I have to tell ya. He wasn't out there very long!

For the Logrollers, senior Steve Johnson had four hits and Mike Hill had two hits and scored five runs. For the Lakers, Terry Farrand and Tom Conto scored SIX RUNS EACH!

White Lake led 10-6 after three and 17-11 after four. But in the fifth, Wabeno sent 20 batters to the plate and scored 16 runs. Wabeno put another eight runs up in the top of the sixth to pull way out ahead, but White Lake came back in the bottom of the inning and almost sent the game into the seventh inning.

Wabeno had just brought baseball back a few years earlier, and did not have any Little League program at the time. We really were not very experienced. White Lake was almost all freshmen and sophomores at the time, with a handful of juniors who had decided to come out for the first time.

SCORING RECORDS:
White Lake scored 24 runs in a losing cause...ranked 1st nationally. "It's quite a dubious distinction," remarked Maule.
The two teams combined for 69 runs...ranked 3rd nationally. In 1977 Dufor, Oregon beat Cascade Falls 63-3; in 1925, Safford, Arizona beat Tucson Indian School 56-6. I always noted that ours was the only game where both teams were fairly competitive and the score was "natural" instead of someone trying to humiliate someone else. Most likely, ours was the only one of the three played under a ten-run mercy rule as well.

I have kept no track of records since then. It doesn't matter. This was our moment, frozen in time. We didn't even realize that it was any type of record until several days later. but we'll always remember the collapsing ump, Swanny and Maule searching up and down the dugouts for someone--ANYONE--who could throw a strike. The two coaches--good friends, by the way--out on the field arguing calls and trying not to laugh or cry about the whole thing. Maybe it doesn't compare to any of the State championships won by the conference, but in a way--it was one of the NLC's most historic moments...and it was FUN! Enjoy the moments, kids. Enjoy 'em all.


Talk about being mathematically challenged, you have that the two teams combined to score 69 runs, when really they only combined to score 59 runs.

Quote 0 0
baseball0609_old
thats crazy but i dont get it i just dont see how that many runs could be scored...like i play baseball and i've played teams that were far better than us and they still only scored like 15 or so 34 haha what a game...


do you tihnk at a point they were just seeing how high they could the score up too or where they trying the whole gmae?
Quote 0 0
theoldroller
Quote:
ORIGINAL: TheGreat1

Quote:
ORIGINAL: TheOldRoller

I originally posted this in the Northern Lakes board, but thought i would post it here as well. A little piece of Wisconsin baseball history.
[/i]
As I promised. I had to go through some old scrapbooks to find this, but I found the [i]MILWUAKEE JOURNAL
article with all the pertinent numbers in it. (As you can guess by the dates involved, there are no online copies of the article, although I may someday transcribe it. This is mostly my writing, but Tom Enlund of the Journal wrote the article from which I'm culling stats and quotes.)

---------
In the eternally youthful spring of 1981, two Northern Lakes Conference baseball teams met beneath a steely gray Langlade County sky in an epic battle that would redefine the game of...alright, the truth is that the game was just plain strange. "It all sounds odd," Wabeno baseball coach Ron Swanson told the Journal, "But if you were at the game and saw how everything piled up, you'd understand."

The final score was Wabeno 35 and White lake 24. The game lasted only six innings--but took over 3 1/2 hours to play. The after school game was finally called by virtue of the ten run rule, at about eight o'clock in the evening!

I remember that at one point in about the fourth inning, the base umpire collapsed to the ground with a back spasm. I honest to God thought he had died of a heart attack! He dropped like a sack of frozen cantaloupes, with a disgusting thud and not a lot of bounce. Turns out it wouldn't be the strangest thing I saw all day.

"We'd get up by 16 or 17 runs, and they'd get back to eight or nine and we'd have to keep going," said Swanson. "Finally, after the sixth we had a big enough lead to end it."

White Lake coach, George Maule, however thinks his team might have been able to win if a seventh inning would have been played. "As it was going--back and forth--if we'd have gone another inning, who knows?" he said.

HERE'S MY FAVORITE SENTENCE FROM ENLUND'S ARTICLE: Both coaches agreed that the game was not fundamentally sound. Ya think? The two teams combined for 22 errors--that's the offical book. I was a freshman keeping the visiting book, and I had it at 25 errors, but I was always cheap about giving out hits that aren't really hits! The four White Lake pitchers walked 21 batters, and the three Wabeno pitchers walked 17. (38 walks for those of you who are mathematically challenged.) Swanny sent sophomore Bill Schlafke to the mound with the instruction to "just throw a strike." The speed didn't matter. We just wanted anything but another walk. Bill's a friend of mine, but I have to tell ya. He wasn't out there very long!

For the Logrollers, senior Steve Johnson had four hits and Mike Hill had two hits and scored five runs. For the Lakers, Terry Farrand and Tom Conto scored SIX RUNS EACH!

White Lake led 10-6 after three and 17-11 after four. But in the fifth, Wabeno sent 20 batters to the plate and scored 16 runs. Wabeno put another eight runs up in the top of the sixth to pull way out ahead, but White Lake came back in the bottom of the inning and almost sent the game into the seventh inning.

Wabeno had just brought baseball back a few years earlier, and did not have any Little League program at the time. We really were not very experienced. White Lake was almost all freshmen and sophomores at the time, with a handful of juniors who had decided to come out for the first time.

SCORING RECORDS:
White Lake scored 24 runs in a losing cause...ranked 1st nationally. "It's quite a dubious distinction," remarked Maule.
The two teams combined for 69 runs...ranked 3rd nationally. In 1977 Dufor, Oregon beat Cascade Falls 63-3; in 1925, Safford, Arizona beat Tucson Indian School 56-6. I always noted that ours was the only game where both teams were fairly competitive and the score was "natural" instead of someone trying to humiliate someone else. Most likely, ours was the only one of the three played under a ten-run mercy rule as well.

I have kept no track of records since then. It doesn't matter. This was our moment, frozen in time. We didn't even realize that it was any type of record until several days later. but we'll always remember the collapsing ump, Swanny and Maule searching up and down the dugouts for someone--ANYONE--who could throw a strike. The two coaches--good friends, by the way--out on the field arguing calls and trying not to laugh or cry about the whole thing. Maybe it doesn't compare to any of the State championships won by the conference, but in a way--it was one of the NLC's most historic moments...and it was FUN! Enjoy the moments, kids. Enjoy 'em all.


Talk about being mathematically challenged, you have that the two teams combined to score 69 runs, when really they only combined to score 59 runs.


Typo, sorry. The 5 key is next to the 6 key. Add one more error and charge it to me![X(]


Quote 0 0
yfinn6_old
Haha, that's awesome. That would have been a funny game to watch. Reminds me of the times playing baseball when a ball hit to the shortstop turned into a 4 base error. If there were guys on base, look out. [:-]
"It's not the players losing games, it's Ned Yost." - OnWisconsin2007 - 26 April 2008
Quote 0 0
theoldroller
I was at the game--as a freshman. I didn't get to play but kept the visitor's score book. I can absolutely guarantee you that while parts of the game were funny in the comical sense, there was nothing "funny" going on with the scoring. Both teams wanted to win that ball game and were trying their best.

The main problem was the pitching. The bases were almost constantly loaded because of the incredible number of walks. So, the pitchers at times were just lobbing them in there to try and get a strike. Then they got hit. Whenever somebody got a hit, they almost instantly had 2 or 3 RBI, because the bases were always juiced. There were also over 20 errors in the game. When you sit in the field while four guys get walked in a row, and then the ball suddenly gets hit, you're slower to react.

Wabeno had just reinstated baseball a few years before, and had no little league program. We never played "hardball" until we got to high school. White lake was a bunch of freshmen and sophomores with no more experience than the Wabeno kids had.

It was a weird and sloppy game, but it was real and honest.


Quote 0 0
jwood902
How did these teams do the rest of the year?
Quote 0 0
theoldroller
It was more like a kickball game!


Quote 0 0
theoldroller
I don't honestly remember how White Lake did. They might have finished at or near the bottom. Wabeno finished in the bottom half of the conference, but they weren't a complete bottom-feeder. With only a few changes, the Wabeno team went to the Sectionals the following year.


Quote 0 0
Undercover_Stud_old
too boring to read that all 1981?
Manitowoc Lincoln Ships - Last Basketball FRVC Champs



http://www.myspace.com/hcrecord

Quote 0 0
tlfarrand
Wow I was the SS on the losing team and scored six runs. It was so bad I got to pitch in the 5th inning. The first and last time I pitched in a game. If we could have only gotten back to the top of the order in the bottom of the 6th we had a chance.
Quote 0 0
whfan202
tlfarrand wrote:
Wow I was the SS on the losing team and scored six runs. It was so bad I got to pitch in the 5th inning. The first and last time I pitched in a game. If we could have only gotten back to the top of the order in the bottom of the 6th we had a chance.

Bump of the year.
SJM, BSM, forever in my heart. WSN Hall of Fame, Class of 2016 Twitter: https://twitter.com/J_Michaels25
Quote 0 0
wissportsnet

Boys Basketball Alumni Round-up: February 21st, from @ColtonWilson23 #wisbb -- https://t.co/0K6CZzZWpf https://t.co/715tfpBGVS

wissportsnet

WSN15: Boys Basketball Top Teams #12 -- Two NCAA Division I players at one WIAA Division 4 school = state champions… https://t.co/1MThqzce9L

wissportsnet

Predicting winners of every state wrestling title plus a look By The Numbers, from @Nate_Woelfel -… https://t.co/HgU1bLP7d6

wissportsnet

Join the free Boys Basketball Playoff Pick 'Em Contest; Staff picks coming Tuesday #wisbb -- https://t.co/Y6yTA3OgP8 https://t.co/hA6Uyw9uje