legendoflambeau
Ok, I am really starting to try to lose some weight and I am wondering if I should focus more on cardio work or incorporate lifting and cardio? Just wondering what you guys think would work the best.

I understand that diet is almost just as important as the work and I am working on that right now.
Keep Calm Chive On
Twitter: @Lumberstotle
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roadkill1
Legend of Lambeau wrote:


Ok, I am really starting to try to lose some weight and I am wondering if I should focus more on cardio work or incorporate lifting and cardio? Just wondering what you guys think would work the best.

I understand that diet is almost just as important as the work and I am working on that right now.


Diet is the most important component.
60-30-10 rule will be helpful.

Mix cardio and weightlifting.

Weightlifting doing circuit training can cause you to burn more calories if you work rapidly enough.
"Aerobic," using oxygen, helps burn more.

Chart your workouts and progress.

Good luck, once you get started it becomes easier and you will become addicted!!!



RK
"So what is big is not always the Trout nor the Deer but the chance, the being there. And what is full is not necessarily the creel nor the freezer, but the memory." ~ Aldo Leopold
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legendoflambeau
road kill wrote:


Legend of Lambeau wrote:


Ok, I am really starting to try to lose some weight and I am wondering if I should focus more on cardio work or incorporate lifting and cardio? Just wondering what you guys think would work the best.

I understand that diet is almost just as important as the work and I am working on that right now.


Diet is the most important component.
60-30-10 rule will be helpful.

Mix cardio and weightlifting.

Weightlifting doing circuit training can cause you to burn more calories if you work rapidly enough.
"Aerobic," using oxygen, helps burn more.

Chart your workouts and progress.

Good luck, once you get started it becomes easier and you will become addicted!!!



RK


What kind of cardio would be the best? Treadmill, eliptical, stair stepper?
Keep Calm Chive On
Twitter: @Lumberstotle
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newmen
Have a bowl of cereal for breakfast and some yogurt.

A sandwich for lunch and an apple (or some type of fruit for lunch)

Don't have too much for dinner.

Nothing but fruits and vegetables after 7:00 p.m.

No soda and plenty of water.

Fast food only once a week.
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Pick 'Em Champ: 2011 Cloverbelt BB, '11 State Football Playoffs
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roadkill1
Legend of Lambeau wrote:


road kill wrote:


Legend of Lambeau wrote:


Ok, I am really starting to try to lose some weight and I am wondering if I should focus more on cardio work or incorporate lifting and cardio? Just wondering what you guys think would work the best.

I understand that diet is almost just as important as the work and I am working on that right now.


Diet is the most important component.
60-30-10 rule will be helpful.

Mix cardio and weightlifting.

Weightlifting doing circuit training can cause you to burn more calories if you work rapidly enough.
"Aerobic," using oxygen, helps burn more.

Chart your workouts and progress.

Good luck, once you get started it becomes easier and you will become addicted!!!



RK


What kind of cardio would be the best? Treadmill, eliptical, stair stepper?


Use a stationary bike that has a heart rate monitor.
Work on getting your heart rate up into the upper 120's, then 130's and ultimately the 140's.
Increase resistance as you get into better condition.

Take your time though, start at a 1.5 or so resistance at 100 rpm's for 10-15 minutes.
It will get easier with time.

Then go do your weight training.
It will happen quickly if you set a standard for yourself and stick to it.
After a few sessions it will no longer be discipline, it will be who you are!!!

Get-R-Dun!!


RK


"So what is big is not always the Trout nor the Deer but the chance, the being there. And what is full is not necessarily the creel nor the freezer, but the memory." ~ Aldo Leopold
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legendoflambeau
Thanks a bunch
Keep Calm Chive On
Twitter: @Lumberstotle
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wizzler
Start slow. If you dive into this kind of stuff you are prone to fail. It is tough work. You can't lose 30 pounds in a day and if you do it in a month you are likely to put it back on.

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jtownsupporter
I enjoy RK's suggestions, and I really like the emphasis on diet and not supplements!

Newmen I agree with you on the soda, its unreal how much sugar is in a can.
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legendoflambeau
The soda thing isn't much of an issue being that I drink Diet all the time....its those dang energy drinks I mix in every now and then instead of coffee or something else in the morning.
Keep Calm Chive On
Twitter: @Lumberstotle
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newmen
Here are some things to consider.

A pound of fat contains 3500 calories.
Reduce your caloric intake and increase caloric expenditure to create a negative energy balance. (Example. Eat 2000 calories a day, Use 2500. This equals 1lb. less per week)

Your body will get 60% of its energy from fat and 40% from carbohydrates during an hour of fairly intense exercise. (something like biking or maybe even basketball)
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twista05
Newmen wrote:


Here are some things to consider.

A pound of fat contains 3500 calories.
Reduce your caloric intake and increase caloric expenditure to create a negative energy balance. (Example. Eat 2000 calories a day, Use 2500. This equals 1lb. less per week)

Your body will get 60% of its energy from fat and 40% from carbohydrates during an hour of fairly intense exercise. (something like biking or maybe even basketball)


Um, Wrong.

Your body draws energy from faster-burning energy sources such as Muscle during intense exercise. To burn fat a person has to do low-intensity and high-volumes of exercise. When your heart rate is around 130 for someone relatively young (17-30) you will burn fat, the closer you get to 170 the worse it gets and muscle will be burned to produce energy. Carbs also provide some of the energy but if trying to burn fat and keep muscle one must do low intensity exercise for longer periods of time.
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twista05
The only thing I would like to add to rk's advice is to do the cardio after the weight training, if you burn a lot of your energy doing cardio your lifts will not be as effective because you will be lifting less than your full potential therefore your muscles will not be worked as much. Do a few minutes of light cardio to warm your muscles up if you want, lift, do your cardio workout, then Stretch! Don't stretch before running or lifting, it causes injury.
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twista05
GTGF08 wrote:


Twista_05 wrote:


The only thing I would like to add to rk's advice is to do the cardio after the weight training, if you burn a lot of your energy doing cardio your lifts will not be as effective because you will be lifting less than your full potential therefore your muscles will not be worked as much. Do a few minutes of light cardio to warm your muscles up if you want, lift, do your cardio workout, then Stretch! Don't stretch before running or lifting, it causes injury.

I'm not disputing this, but I've never heard it before. What's the reason?


Found exactly what I wanted to say at this website [link=http://www.dailyspark.com/blog.asp?post=4_reasons_to_stop_stretching_before_you_exercise]http://www.dailyspark.c...hing_before_you_exercise[/link]

The one thing you shouldn't do at this time is the very thing that most people do: stretch. So why is stretching before a workout a bad idea?

Here are four reasons why you shouldn't stretch before you exercise. [ol]Stretching is not the same thing as warming up. Confusing stretching with warming up is an all-too-common mistake, so don't feel bad if you thought the two were one in the same. You should spend a few minutes doing lighter intensity activity that mimics your upcoming workout?walking before running, slow cycling before biking, light aerobics before a fitness class. [link=http://www.sparkpeople.com/resource/fitness_articles.asp?id=1036]That is a warm-up[/link]. It gives your body time to adjust to the higher demands of exercise so that your breathing rate, circulation and heart rate can all increase in order to supply your working muscles with the blood, nutrients and oxygen they need to keep things running smoothly. Warming up also helps lubricate your joints. [link=http://www.sparkpeople.com/resource/fitness_articles.asp?id=1034]Stretching does not serve the same purposes[/link] and therefore does not pass for a warm-up.
Stretching before a workout undermines your warm up. If you are going to stretch before a work out, you need to warm up first, and then stop moving in order to stretch. Have you ever thought about how the act of stopping to stretch cancels out the benefits of warming up? Your body temperature, heart rate, and breathing rate all drop considerably once you stop moving. After a few stretches, you're practically back to where you started: with cold muscles and a resting heart rate that is not ready to jump into a work out. This is one of the biggest reasons I do not advocate stretching after a warm up session. However, if you were to warm up, stretch, and then warm up again, that might be OK. But who has the time for all that?
Stretching does not prevent injury. It wasn't long ago that fitness experts used to say that stretching would prevent injury. That's part of the reason people were encouraged to stretch before physical activity. But research has not been able to prove this theory. These days, it's generally accepted among fitness trainers, athletic trainers and physical therapists that the act of stretching does not prevent injury, no matter when you do it. According to [link=http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory?id=10380462]a recent story by AP medical writer Maria Cheng[/link], CDC experts who reviewed more than 100 stretching studies found that "people who stretched before exercise were no less likely to suffer injuries such as a pulled muscle, which the increased flexibility from stretching is supposed to prevent." So if you have been stretching before your workouts in an effort to prevent a sprain or strain, your efforts might be in vain.
Stretching before exercise may actually increase your risk of injury. That's not just because it undermines your warm up. "Traditional stretches, like when people bend over to touch their toes or stretch their legs on a fence," wrote Cheng, "often cause the muscles to tighten rather than relax?exactly the opposite of what is needed for physical activity." Your risk of overstretching at this time is greater, and this tightness can undermine your speed and range of motion when you start exercising. Some research has shown that certain athletes who stretch are more susceptible to injuries and performance problems. Experts theorize that a certain amount of "tightness" is needed for muscle strength and power in certain sports, such as throwing a fastball or kicking a soccer ball. The one thing you shouldn't do at this time is the very thing that most people do: stretch. So why is stretching before a workout a bad idea?
[/ol]
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hillmatic39
Twista_05 wrote:


GTGF08 wrote:


Twista_05 wrote:


The only thing I would like to add to rk's advice is to do the cardio after the weight training, if you burn a lot of your energy doing cardio your lifts will not be as effective because you will be lifting less than your full potential therefore your muscles will not be worked as much. Do a few minutes of light cardio to warm your muscles up if you want, lift, do your cardio workout, then Stretch! Don't stretch before running or lifting, it causes injury.

I'm not disputing this, but I've never heard it before. What's the reason?


Found exactly what I wanted to say at this website [link=http://www.dailyspark.com/blog.asp?post=4_reasons_to_stop_stretching_before_you_exercise]http://www.dailyspark.c...hing_before_you_exercise[/link]

The one thing you shouldn't do at this time is the very thing that most people do: stretch. So why is stretching before a workout a bad idea?

Here are four reasons why you shouldn't stretch before you exercise. [ol]Stretching is not the same thing as warming up. Confusing stretching with warming up is an all-too-common mistake, so don't feel bad if you thought the two were one in the same. You should spend a few minutes doing lighter intensity activity that mimics your upcoming workout?walking before running, slow cycling before biking, light aerobics before a fitness class. [link=http://www.sparkpeople.com/resource/fitness_articles.asp?id=1036]That is a warm-up[/link]. It gives your body time to adjust to the higher demands of exercise so that your breathing rate, circulation and heart rate can all increase in order to supply your working muscles with the blood, nutrients and oxygen they need to keep things running smoothly. Warming up also helps lubricate your joints. [link=http://www.sparkpeople.com/resource/fitness_articles.asp?id=1034]Stretching does not serve the same purposes[/link] and therefore does not pass for a warm-up. Stretching before a workout undermines your warm up. If you are going to stretch before a work out, you need to warm up first, and then stop moving in order to stretch. Have you ever thought about how the act of stopping to stretch cancels out the benefits of warming up? Your body temperature, heart rate, and breathing rate all drop considerably once you stop moving. After a few stretches, you're practically back to where you started: with cold muscles and a resting heart rate that is not ready to jump into a work out. This is one of the biggest reasons I do not advocate stretching after a warm up session. However, if you were to warm up, stretch, and then warm up again, that might be OK. But who has the time for all that? Stretching does not prevent injury. It wasn't long ago that fitness experts used to say that stretching would prevent injury. That's part of the reason people were encouraged to stretch before physical activity. But research has not been able to prove this theory. These days, it's generally accepted among fitness trainers, athletic trainers and physical therapists that the act of stretching does not prevent injury, no matter when you do it. According to [link=http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory?id=10380462]a recent story by AP medical writer Maria Cheng[/link], CDC experts who reviewed more than 100 stretching studies found that "people who stretched before exercise were no less likely to suffer injuries such as a pulled muscle, which the increased flexibility from stretching is supposed to prevent." So if you have been stretching before your workouts in an effort to prevent a sprain or strain, your efforts might be in vain. Stretching before exercise may actually increase your risk of injury. That's not just because it undermines your warm up. "Traditional stretches, like when people bend over to touch their toes or stretch their legs on a fence," wrote Cheng, "often cause the muscles to tighten rather than relax?exactly the opposite of what is needed for physical activity." Your risk of overstretching at this time is greater, and this tightness can undermine your speed and range of motion when you start exercising. Some research has shown that certain athletes who stretch are more susceptible to injuries and performance problems. Experts theorize that a certain amount of "tightness" is needed for muscle strength and power in certain sports, such as throwing a fastball or kicking a soccer ball. The one thing you shouldn't do at this time is the very thing that most people do: stretch. So why is stretching before a workout a bad idea? [/ol]


There's a lot of debate over this in the field right now. Some experts have found research that suggests stretching should be done before and after workouts, some suggest just after, even some suggest not at all, simply maintaining proper mobility in joints is enough.

As far as weight lifting goes, stretching should NOT be done prior to resistance training, as "loosening the muscles" can increase the risk for injury. Addtionally, any explosive or power lifting should NOT involve stretching pre-activity as it is detrimental to the stretch shortening cycle.

Great articel on the debate of stretching...
[link=http://athleticbusiness.com/articles/article.aspx?articleid=3455&zoneid=7]http://athleticbusiness...icleid=3455&zoneid=7[/link]
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badger551
Twista_05 wrote:


The only thing I would like to add to rk's advice is to do the cardio after the weight training, if you burn a lot of your energy doing cardio your lifts will not be as effective because you will be lifting less than your full potential therefore your muscles will not be worked as much. Do a few minutes of light cardio to warm your muscles up if you want, lift, do your cardio workout, then Stretch! Don't stretch before running or lifting, it causes injury.

I'm not disputing this, but I've never heard it before. What's the reason?
Quote 0 0
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